Category

peaches

Fresh Fruit Crepes

By | dessert, main dish, peaches, posts, vegetarian

Servings: 6
Serve these crepes for brunch or as a light dessert. Mix up the fruit based on what’s available and in season.

Ingredients

Fruit Topping
1⁄4 cup brown sugar juice of 1 lime
2 cups sliced fresh strawberries
1⁄2 cup fresh peaches

Crepes
1 cup low-fat ricotta cheese
2 Tbsp brown sugar
1⁄4 tsp cinnamon
6 (6-inch) flour tortillas
2 tsp margarine

Preparation
Combine brown sugar and lime juice in a small bowl; stir to dissolve sugar. Stir in fruit and set aside. To prepare crepes, combine cheese, brown sugar, and cinnamon in a small bowl. Spoon an even amount of mixture on half of each tortilla; fold over to enclose filling. Melt 1 teaspoon margarine in a large skillet over medium heat. Place 3 of the filled tortillas in the skillet and cook for several minutes on each side until crisp and lightly browned. Repeat with remaining margarine and tortillas. Spoon fruit topping over crepes and serve while hot.

Source
Champions for Change

Fruit Sorbet

By | dessert, peaches, posts, vegetarian
DateThursday, April 12, 2012 at 11:15AM

Servings: 4xXx: Return of Xander Cage (2017)

Ingredients
1 pound frozen strawberries, peaches, raspberries, blueberries or other fruit
1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt

Preparation
Put all the ingredients in a food processor along with a couple of tablespoons of water. Process until just pureed and creamy, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. If the fruit does not break down completely, add a little more water through the feed tube, a tablespoon or two at a time, being careful to not over-process the mixture, or the sorbet will liquefy. Serve immediately, or freeze it for later. If serving later, allow 10 to 15 minutes for sorbet to soften at room temperature.

Fresh Fruit Crepes

By | dessert, main dish, peaches, posts, vegetarian
DateTuesday, April 17, 2012 at 11:25AM

Servings: 6
Serve these crepes for brunch or as a light dessert. Mix up the fruit based on what’s available and in season.

Ingredients

Fruit Topping
1⁄4 cup brown sugar juice of 1 lime
2 cups sliced fresh strawberries
1⁄2 cup fresh peaches

Crepes
1 cup low-fat ricotta cheese
2 Tbsp brown sugar
1⁄4 tsp cinnamon
6 (6-inch) flour tortillas
2 tsp margarine

Preparation
Combine brown sugar and lime juice in a small bowl; stir to dissolve sugar. Stir in fruit and set aside. To prepare crepes, combine cheese, brown sugar, and cinnamon in a small bowl. Spoon an even amount of mixture on half of each tortilla; fold over to enclose filling. Melt 1 teaspoon margarine in a large skillet over medium heat. Place 3 of the filled tortillas in the skillet and cook for several minutes on each side until crisp and lightly browned. Repeat with remaining margarine and tortillas. Spoon fruit topping over crepes and serve while hot.

Source
Champions for Change

Fresh Fruit Crepes

By | dessert, main dish, peaches, posts, vegetarian
DateTuesday, April 17, 2012 at 11:25AM

Servings: 6
Serve these crepes for brunch or as a light dessert. Mix up the fruit based on what’s available and in season.

Ingredients

Fruit Topping
1⁄4 cup brown sugar juice of 1 lime
2 cups sliced fresh strawberries
1⁄2 cup fresh peaches

Crepes
1 cup low-fat ricotta cheese
2 Tbsp brown sugar
1⁄4 tsp cinnamon
6 (6-inch) flour tortillas
2 tsp margarine

Preparation
Combine brown sugar and lime juice in a small bowl; stir to dissolve sugar. Stir in fruit and set aside. To prepare crepes, combine cheese, brown sugar, and cinnamon in a small bowl. Spoon an even amount of mixture on half of each tortilla; fold over to enclose filling. Melt 1 teaspoon margarine in a large skillet over medium heat. Place 3 of the filled tortillas in the skillet and cook for several minutes on each side until crisp and lightly browned. Repeat with remaining margarine and tortillas. Spoon fruit topping over crepes and serve while hot.

Source
Champions for Change

Fruit Sorbet

By | dessert, peaches, posts, vegetarian

Servings: 4

Ingredients
1 pound frozen strawberries, peaches, raspberries, blueberries or other fruit
1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt

Preparation
Put all the ingredients in a food processor along with a couple of tablespoons of water. Process until just pureed and creamy, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. If the fruit does not break down completely, add a little more water through the feed tube, a tablespoon or two at a time, being careful to not over-process the mixture, or the sorbet will liquefy. Serve immediately, or freeze it for later. If serving later, allow 10 to 15 minutes for sorbet to soften at room temperature.

Fruit Sorbet

By | dessert, peaches, posts, vegetarian
DateThursday, April 12, 2012 at 11:15AM

Servings: 4

Ingredients
1 pound frozen strawberries, peaches, raspberries, blueberries or other fruit
1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt

Preparation
Put all the ingredients in a food processor along with a couple of tablespoons of water. Process until just pureed and creamy, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. If the fruit does not break down completely, add a little more water through the feed tube, a tablespoon or two at a time, being careful to not over-process the mixture, or the sorbet will liquefy. Serve immediately, or freeze it for later. If serving later, allow 10 to 15 minutes for sorbet to soften at room temperature.

Fresh Fruit Crepes

By | dessert, main dish, peaches, posts, vegetarian

Servings: 6
Serve these crepes for brunch or as a light dessert. Mix up the fruit based on what’s available and in season.

Ingredients

Fruit Topping
1⁄4 cup brown sugar juice of 1 lime
2 cups sliced fresh strawberries
1⁄2 cup fresh peaches

Crepes
1 cup low-fat ricotta cheese
2 Tbsp brown sugar
1⁄4 tsp cinnamon
6 (6-inch) flour tortillas
2 tsp margarine

Preparation
Combine brown sugar and lime juice in a small bowl; stir to dissolve sugar. Stir in fruit and set aside. To prepare crepes, combine cheese, brown sugar, and cinnamon in a small bowl. Spoon an even amount of mixture on half of each tortilla; fold over to enclose filling. Melt 1 teaspoon margarine in a large skillet over medium heat. Place 3 of the filled tortillas in the skillet and cook for several minutes on each side until crisp and lightly browned. Repeat with remaining margarine and tortillas. Spoon fruit topping over crepes and serve while hot.

Source
Champions for Change

Fruit Pizza

By | classroom friendly, peaches, posts, snack, vegetarian

Servings: 6

Ingredients
3 whole wheat English muffins or 6 Pita breads
8 oz light cream cheese or Neufchatel cheese
1 banana, peeled and sliced
4 cups of assorted fruit (pineapples, blueberries, honeydew, cantaloupe, pitted cherries, peaches, etc.)

Preparation
Spread cream cheese over pita or a half of English muffin. Arrange the fruit on the pizza in a design you desire. Be creative! If using a pita bread, cut into wedges.

Complementary Lessons
Fun with FiberMy Plate

Empowering Youth, Feeding Neighborhoods

By | corn, peaches, posts
DateFriday, August 17, 2012 at 11:06AM

By Shawnee Adelson, Youth Education Facilitor

Fairmont Elementary Youth Farmers’ Market, Photo by Heidi ObermanYouth Farmers’ Markets have started, so come out and support youth gardening programs and buy some fresh, local produce!

A youth farmers’ market (YFM) is an educational opportunity where elementary students are given a real world venue to share their knowledge of science, gardening and healthy eating, as well as a chance to show-off their math skills. It is appropriately titled a youth farmers’ market because many of the youth working at the market have grown the produce in the garden at the school. This garden produce is supplemented with locally grown produce that can be difficult to grow in a small garden plot, such as Western Slope peaches and sweet corn. Most markets are held in the fall and after school to take advantage of the productive gardens and a natural customer base of parents and teachers. Community members and passersby are also encouraged to shop at the markets. All of the market proceeds go directly back into the gardens.

Youth farmers’ markets are coordinated by the Denver Youth Farmers’ Market Coalition, which is a partnership between Denver Urban Gardens and Slow Food Denver. Through the youth farmers’ market program, youth have the potential to learn how to grow their own food, increase their intake of fresh healthy produce, and germinate an interest in sharing what they are learning with the broader community. A YFM focuses on promoting healthy eating habits, reinforcing traditional academics, such as math and science, and building life skills such as customer service, conflict resolution and entrepreneurship. Often a local chef will use the fresh produce to demonstrate the preparation of a healthy meal.

Fairview Youth Farmers’ MarketFairview Elementary, in the Sun Valley neighborhood, has been holding a YFM for almost a decade. This program empowers youth in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Denver by giving them the opportunity to feed their community.  “The way I know that we are helping people is by helping them eat healthy food,” states Lucienne Ndautau, a fifth grader participating in the Fairview Elementary market this summer.

This year, DUG is fortunate to partner with Wholesome Wave to offer the Double Value Coupon Program at a few of the youth farmers’ markets. The Double Value Coupon Program (DVCP) doubles the value of SNAP benefits (formerly known as food stamps) spent on locally grown foods. For every dollar of federal benefits that a shopper spends at the market, DVCP provides a matching dollar. The implementation of DVCP has the potential to increase consumption of healthy produce by participating community members and support the viability of small and midsize farms by creating new revenue streams. DVCP generates economic stimulus in communities by keeping federal nutrition benefit funds within local and regional communities.

This will be the eighth year the Coalition has been running YFMs, and this year it looks like we will have over 30 schools and afterschool programs holding markets. A few markets have already started, but the majority will be held in September and October. For a full list of markets, locations and times, click here.

As a resource to other communities and new schools wishing to start a youth farmers’ market program, the Denver Youth Farmers’ Market Coalition has created a best practices handbook. Check out the digital version here, or contact us for a hard copy!

Empowering Youth, Feeding Neighborhoods

By | corn, peaches, posts

By Shawnee Adelson, Youth Education Facilitor

Fairmont Elementary Youth Farmers’ Market, Photo by Heidi ObermanYouth Farmers’ Markets have started, so come out and support youth gardening programs and buy some fresh, local produce!

A youth farmers’ market (YFM) is an educational opportunity where elementary students are given a real world venue to share their knowledge of science, gardening and healthy eating, as well as a chance to show-off their math skills. It is appropriately titled a youth farmers’ market because many of the youth working at the market have grown the produce in the garden at the school. This garden produce is supplemented with locally grown produce that can be difficult to grow in a small garden plot, such as Western Slope peaches and sweet corn. Most markets are held in the fall and after school to take advantage of the productive gardens and a natural customer base of parents and teachers. Community members and passersby are also encouraged to shop at the markets. All of the market proceeds go directly back into the gardens.

Youth farmers’ markets are coordinated by the Denver Youth Farmers’ Market Coalition, which is a partnership between Denver Urban Gardens and Slow Food Denver. Through the youth farmers’ market program, youth have the potential to learn how to grow their own food, increase their intake of fresh healthy produce, and germinate an interest in sharing what they are learning with the broader community. A YFM focuses on promoting healthy eating habits, reinforcing traditional academics, such as math and science, and building life skills such as customer service, conflict resolution and entrepreneurship. Often a local chef will use the fresh produce to demonstrate the preparation of a healthy meal.

Fairview Youth Farmers’ MarketFairview Elementary, in the Sun Valley neighborhood, has been holding a YFM for almost a decade. This program empowers youth in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Denver by giving them the opportunity to feed their community.  “The way I know that we are helping people is by helping them eat healthy food,” states Lucienne Ndautau, a fifth grader participating in the Fairview Elementary market this summer.

This year, DUG is fortunate to partner with Wholesome Wave to offer the Double Value Coupon Program at a few of the youth farmers’ markets. The Double Value Coupon Program (DVCP) doubles the value of SNAP benefits (formerly known as food stamps) spent on locally grown foods. For every dollar of federal benefits that a shopper spends at the market, DVCP provides a matching dollar. The implementation of DVCP has the potential to increase consumption of healthy produce by participating community members and support the viability of small and midsize farms by creating new revenue streams. DVCP generates economic stimulus in communities by keeping federal nutrition benefit funds within local and regional communities.

This will be the eighth year the Coalition has been running YFMs, and this year it looks like we will have over 30 schools and afterschool programs holding markets. A few markets have already started, but the majority will be held in September and October. For a full list of markets, locations and times, click here

As a resource to other communities and new schools wishing to start a youth farmers’ market program, the Denver Youth Farmers’ Market Coalition has created a best practices handbook. Check out the digital version here, or contact us for a hard copy!