Category

potatoes

Potato Saute with Onions and Bell Peppers

By | corn, posts, potatoes, side dish, vegetarian
DateTuesday, April 17, 2012 at 11:01AM

Servings: 4
This recipe is great as a side dish with dinner or for breakfast.

Ingredients
2 cups water
2 large russet potatoes, cleaned and cut in half
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
1⁄2 cup chopped onion
1⁄2 cup chopped green and red bell pepper
1⁄2 cup corn (fresh, canned or frozen and thawed)
1⁄2 cup chopped tomato
1⁄2 tsp oregano
1⁄4 tsp each salt and ground black pepper
1⁄4 cup crumbled queso fresco or reduced fat Monterey Jack cheese

Preparation
Bring water to a boil in a large pan. Add potatoes and cook until crisp-tender, about 15 minutes. Drain well and cut into bite-size pieces. Heat oil in a large skillet. Sauté onion until golden brown and soft. Add potatoes and bell pepper to skillet and cook over medium- high heat, stirring frequently, until golden brown. Stir in corn, tomato, oregano, salt and ground black pepper. Top with cheese.

Source
Champions for Change

Easy Crockpot Applesauce

By | apples, food preservation, posts, potatoes, vegan, vegetarian
DateMonday, April 16, 2012 at 12:47PM

Servings: 4
Good enough to eat alone, or try it on toast, pancakes or fried potatoes.

Ingredients
6 apples
1 cinnamon stick

Preparation
Peel and core all apples. Cut apples into small chunks. Put apples and cinnamon stick in the crockpot. Turn crockpot on low heat and stir periodically. When applesauce looks ready, turn off and let cool.

For information on safe food preservation techniques see Colorado State University Extension website.

Potato Saute with Onions and Bell Peppers

By | corn, posts, potatoes, side dish, vegetarian
DateTuesday, April 17, 2012 at 11:01AM

Servings: 4
This recipe is great as a side dish with dinner or for breakfast.

Ingredients
2 cups water
2 large russet potatoes, cleaned and cut in half
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
1⁄2 cup chopped onion
1⁄2 cup chopped green and red bell pepper
1⁄2 cup corn (fresh, canned or frozen and thawed)
1⁄2 cup chopped tomato
1⁄2 tsp oregano
1⁄4 tsp each salt and ground black pepper
1⁄4 cup crumbled queso fresco or reduced fat Monterey Jack cheese

Preparation
Bring water to a boil in a large pan. Add potatoes and cook until crisp-tender, about 15 minutes. Drain well and cut into bite-size pieces. Heat oil in a large skillet. Sauté onion until golden brown and soft. Add potatoes and bell pepper to skillet and cook over medium- high heat, stirring frequently, until golden brown. Stir in corn, tomato, oregano, salt and ground black pepper. Top with cheese.

Source
Champions for Change

Easy Crockpot Applesauce

By | apples, food preservation, posts, potatoes, vegan, vegetarian
DateMonday, April 16, 2012 at 12:47PM

Servings: 4
Good enough to eat alone, or try it on toast, pancakes or fried potatoes.

Ingredients
6 apples
1 cinnamon stick

Preparation
Peel and core all apples. Cut apples into small chunks. Put apples and cinnamon stick in the crockpot. Turn crockpot on low heat and stir periodically. When applesauce looks ready, turn off and let cool.

For information on safe food preservation techniques see Colorado State University Extension website.

Easy Crockpot Applesauce

By | apples, food preservation, posts, potatoes, vegan, vegetarian

Servings: 4
Good enough to eat alone, or try it on toast, pancakes or fried potatoes.

Ingredients
6 apples
1 cinnamon stick

Preparation
Peel and core all apples. Cut apples into small chunks. Put apples and cinnamon stick in the crockpot. Turn crockpot on low heat and stir periodically. When applesauce looks ready, turn off and let cool.

For information on safe food preservation techniques see Colorado State University Extension website.

Potato Saute with Onions and Bell Peppers

By | corn, posts, potatoes, side dish, vegetarian
DateTuesday, April 17, 2012 at 11:01AM

Servings: 4
This recipe is great as a side dish with dinner or for breakfast.

Ingredients
2 cups water
2 large russet potatoes, cleaned and cut in half
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
1⁄2 cup chopped onion
1⁄2 cup chopped green and red bell pepper
1⁄2 cup corn (fresh, canned or frozen and thawed)
1⁄2 cup chopped tomato
1⁄2 tsp oregano
1⁄4 tsp each salt and ground black pepper
1⁄4 cup crumbled queso fresco or reduced fat Monterey Jack cheese

Preparation
Bring water to a boil in a large pan. Add potatoes and cook until crisp-tender, about 15 minutes. Drain well and cut into bite-size pieces. Heat oil in a large skillet. Sauté onion until golden brown and soft. Add potatoes and bell pepper to skillet and cook over medium- high heat, stirring frequently, until golden brown. Stir in corn, tomato, oregano, salt and ground black pepper. Top with cheese.

Source
Champions for Change

Homemade Vegetable Soup

By | carrots, corn, herbs, posts, potatoes, soup, tomatoes, vegan, vegetarian
DateThursday, April 12, 2012 at 12:13PM

Servings: 8-10

Ingredients
1 small onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, diced
Salt and pepper to taste
2 carrots, diced
2 stalks of celery, diced
2 medium potatoes, diced
1 can kidney beans, rinsed of extra salt & drained
1 large can (128 ounces) whole tomatoes, roughly chopped
2 quarts water
Pinch of the following dry herbs: thyme, basil leaves, oregano, garlic powder, onion powder and parsley

Preparation
Saute onions and garlic in a heavy pan. Add all ingredients and cook on medium heat for 15 minutes. Let simmer for 35 minutes. Eat with corn bread or crackers

Source
Vanessa Lawrence

Easy Crockpot Applesauce

By | apples, food preservation, posts, potatoes, vegan, vegetarian

Servings: 4
Good enough to eat alone, or try it on toast, pancakes or fried potatoes.

Ingredients
6 apples
1 cinnamon stick

Preparation
Peel and core all apples. Cut apples into small chunks. Put apples and cinnamon stick in the crockpot. Turn crockpot on low heat and stir periodically. When applesauce looks ready, turn off and let cool.

For information on safe food preservation techniques see Colorado State University Extension website.

Putting the Garden to Bed

By | posts, potatoes, tomatoes

Friday, October 19, 2012 at 1:27PM

By Judy Elliott, Senior Education Specialist

Fall is a season of dramatic contrasts; transitioning from the exuberance of giant zucchinis that seem to escape our notice despite careful searching, tomatoes that always ripen all at once and overwhelm our processing abilities, and days that can show 30 degrees or more of temperature swings between morning and evening.  With decreasing hours of daylight, plants take longer to mature, typical diseases such as ‘powdery mildew’ overtake squash, pumpkins and cucumbers and we begin to embrace the garden rhythms that promote a time of rest. Fall is a time for gardeners to contemplate, plan, preserve the harvest, prepare soil and celebrate small steps along the life path of learning.

To put your garden to bed for the year, follow the steps below, beginning when your crops are still in the ground.

Make a map

  • Note where everything was planted, including quantities of plants used, noting varieties that did well, which insects and/or diseases were challenging.
  • ·Also take note of succession plantings: which early season crops were replaced with heat – loving crops, dates of harvest, mulches used.

Plan for crop rotation

  • In this basic tenet of organic gardening, vegetables in the same ‘family’ are grown in a different location in the garden each year to prevent the build-up of soil diseases and insect problems. It is especially important to practice a two to three year crop rotation for members of the Solanaceae family (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers and eggplants).

Clean up all garden beds

  • Dig up all annual crops and dispose of disease and/or insect infested varieties (do not utilize them in the compost pile). Crops that are left standing in the garden become overwintering sites for pest insects.
  • Make sure the perimeters and aisles surrounding garden areas are weed–free.

Dig the soil in all garden beds

  • Turn the soil, dig in chopped up leaves (try mowing them so they won’t mat down), and add a half inch of compost as you turn the soil.

Plant cover crops

  • By the end of September, or first week in October, plant winter rye and hairy vetch, raking the seeds lightly into the soil, tamping down with a hoe, covering with a layer of weed–free straw or chopped leaves and watering well.

Start or update your compost pile

  • All end–of–season garden material that is free of insects and/or disease can be chopped into one to two inch pieces and incorporated into the compost pile
  • More information about composting can be found here.

Clean and store all garden tools

  • Scrub all tools to remove soil and dry well
  • Use a wire brush or sandpaper to remove rust
  • Use a light layer of vegetable oil to prevent new rust

Remove all garden structures and amendment materials

  • All tomato fences, cages and secondary support structures must be removed from community garden plots
  • Leaves may be mown or chopped, dug into the soil or spread on top as a light mulch. Bags of leaves are not permitted to be stored within community garden plots.

Order garden catalogs

  • Begin the process of dreaming and planning for spring by ordering garden catalogs
  • If you participate in DUG’s Free Seeds and Transplants program, be sure to apply by February 1st

Celebrate each new thing you’ve learned

  • Share your wisdom with friends, giving back more than  you reap. The best gardeners are like a rich compost, embracing communities, growing slowly with the season.

Garden Leader Spotlight

By | carrots, posts, potatoes, tomatoes
DateWednesday, October 24, 2012 at 11:11AM

By Emily Frost, Events and Garden Leader Coordinator

Reuben Gregory has a big heart and a green thumb. For the past year and a half, he has served as the garden leader at the Golfer’s Way Community Garden. Golfer’s Way is an apartment complex managed by Northeast Denver Housing, providing permanent housing for about 40 individuals with special needs who have previously been homeless. This community employs a model that aims to support residents as they work toward self-sufficiency. Reuben works as a case manager for the residents, which includes managing the food pantry on site, as well as working the land in the beds out back.

When Reuben first learned there was a garden on site a year and a half ago, he wasted no time getting started. DUG was able to connect Reuben to free transplants midway through the growing season. As Reuben spent time out in the garden, residents would stop by to watch and express concern that he was “wasting his time.” Their doubt was well founded. Many of the residents at Golfer’s Way had seen well-intentioned people come and go from the garden, but nobody- and thus, no garden- ever lasted more than a season. In a community of people accustomed to transience as a means of survival, with only occasional funding in a tough economy to support consistent case managers, having a garden be the responsibility of only one individual could have meant failure from the start. But Reuben had a different vision, and so he kept showing up.

Understandably skeptical residents would come, watch, and doubt- yet as they were doing so, they were getting to know Reuben better and sharing more about themselves. One man commented that though he had grown up on a farm, it had been thirty-some years since he had gardened. He was invited to pick up a trowel. There were moments of neighbors reminiscing about favorite meals. As the weeds were slowly but surely replaced with tomatoes, peppers, and marigolds, a garden began to take shape. The little plot of land behind the building where the veggies grew became a focal point and a gathering place for residents to engage and foster relationships with their neighbors. By the end of the season, a handful of residents had even begun to take part in caring for the space.

This season, Reuben has had consistent help from about five residents who have taken such ownership over the garden, they will have the opportunity to maintain personal plots next year. The gardeners who currently care for the space appreciate that the produce is communal and have noted that there’s plenty to go around and be shared, so they welcome their neighbors helping themselves. Next season, there will still be significant communal space that will grow produce for any resident who wants it. These communal areas will also continue to provide fresh produce to supplement the food bank for residents. The veggies that go the quickest? Collards, potatoes, and carrots, all of which will be planted in abundance next spring.

Reuben’s next project involves working to bring new life to another Northeast Denver Housing community garden, located at 30th and Lafayette. His commitment to consistently showing up and inviting folks to partake in whatever ways they feel comfortable reflects DUG’s belief that community gardens are most successful when individuals come together to take ownership of a space, and in so doing the fruits that inevitably grow there.

Click here to learn more about our Free Seeds & Transplants Program that helped Golfers’ Way Community Garden, and how you may receive free seeds and plants.